2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

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In late 2019, a new outbreak of a novel coronavirus was reported in Wuhan, China. As of January 21, 2020, there have been around 300 confirmed cases, with several deaths. The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is closely monitoring the situation and provides comprehensive and timely updates.

What are coronaviruses?

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a family of enveloped virus that was first discovered in the 1960s.

Coronaviruses are most commonly found in animals, including camels and bats, and are not typically transmitted between animals and humans. However, six strains of coronavirus were previously known to be capable of transmission from animals to humans, the most well-known being Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) CoV, responsible for a large outbreak in 2003, and Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) CoV, responsible for an outbreak in 2012.

The latest strain, known as 2019 Novel Coronavirus or 2019-nCov, is the seventh strain now known to have been transmitted from animals to humans at an animal and seafood market in Wuhan, China. The growing number of patients who have not had exposure to animal markets suggest that person-to-person transmission is occurring.

 

What are the symptoms of a human coronavirus infection?

Human coronavirus usually causes mild to moderate upper respiratory tract illness, similar to a common cold. Symptoms often include runny nose, headache, cough, sore throat, and fever. Most people contract the illness at some point in their lives and it usually only lasts for a short time. Sometimes human coronaviruses can cause lower respiratory tract infections, such as pneumonia or bronchitis. This is more common in infants, the elderly, or individuals with weakened immune systems. In some serious cases, such as with 2019-nCoV, the virus can cause the severe acute respiratory syndrome, pneumonia, kidney failure, and death.

Infection Control Measures

The CDC provides useful guidance and resources for coronavirus and 2019-nCoV infection control measures. These should all be implemented when patients are suspected of being infected with a coronavirus.

  • Hand hygiene: Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer when soap and water are not available. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed
  • Respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette: Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in the
  • Avoid contact with infected individuals
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects with an EPA-registered
  • For 2019-nCov, the CDC also recommends a mask for confirmed or suspected individuals, eye protection for healthcare workers, and implementing both contact and airborne precautions in addition to standard precautions
  • How are coronaviruses spread?

    Coronaviruses are typically spread through the air via coughing or sneezing, via contact with an infected person or contaminated surfaces, and sometimes, but rarely, via fecal contamination. 2019-nCov is thought to have originally spread from animals to humans, but there is growing evidence of person-to-person transmission. This pattern of transmission was also reported with SARS CoV and MERS CoV.

    Why are human coronaviruses and particularly nCoV a concern?

    Most people get infected with a human coronavirus at some point in their lives and experience cold-like symptoms for a few days before recovering. However, novel coronaviruses—such as MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV, and 2019-nCoV cause severe symptoms including fever, cough, and shortness of breath that can lead to pneumonia and even death. These coronaviruses can quickly spread from person to person and can lead to widespread outbreaks when infected individuals travel to different countries. As with most emerging viruses, the risk depends on a number of factors including ease of transmission, the severity of symptoms, and prevention and treatment options available. In the case of nCoV, there is neither a vaccine nor a specific treatment.

    CloroxProProducts Eligible to be Used Against 2019-nCoV Based on the EPA’s Emerging Viral Pathogen Policy

    The products listed below have demonstrated effectiveness against viruses similar to 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) on hard, non-porous surfaces. Therefore, these products can be used against 2019-nCoV when used in accordance with the directions for use against the virus listed for each product in the table on hard, non-porous surfaces. For more information, refer to the CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/.

     

    Product Name EPA Reg. No. Follow directions for use against stated virus (contact time)
    Clorox Healthcare® Clorox Healthcare® Bleach Germicidal Cleaner Spray 56392-7 Rhinovirus (1 min)
    Clorox Healthcare® Bleach Germicidal Wipes 67619-12 Rhinovirus (1 min)
    Clorox® Broad Spectrum Quaternary Disinfectant Cleaner 67619-20 Rhinovirus (3 min)
    Clorox Healthcare® Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectant 67619-24 Rhinovirus Type 37 (1 min)
    Clorox Healthcare® Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectant Wipes 67619-25 Rhinovirus (1 min)
    Clorox Healthcare® Citrace® Hospital Disinfectant & Sanitizer 67619-29 Rhinovirus (5 min)
    Clorox Healthcare® Fuzion® Cleaner Disinfectant 67619-30 Rhinovirus Type 37 (1 min)
    Clorox Healthcare® Disinfecting Wipes 67619-31 Rotavirus (4 min)
    Clorox Healthcare® VersaSure® Wipes 67619-37 Rotavirus (5 min)
    CloroxPro™ Clorox Commercial Solutions® Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectant 67619-24 Rhinovirus (1 min)
    Clorox Commerical Solutions® Hydrogen Peroxide Cleaner Disinfectant Wipes 67619-25 Rhinovirus (1 min)
    Clorox T360® Disinfecting Cleaner1 67619-38 Adenovirus Type 2 (2 min)
    Clorox Commercial Solutions® Clorox® Disinfecting Bathroom Cleaner 5813-40-67619 Rhinovirus (10 mins)
    Clorox Commercial Solutions® Tilex Soap Scum Remover 5813-40-67619 Rhinovirus (10 mins)
    Clorox Commercial Solutions® Toilet Bowl Cleaner with Bleach1 67619-16 Rhinovirus (10 mins)
    Clorox Commericial Solutions® Clorox® Clean-Up Disinfectant Cleaner with Bleach1 (Spray) 67619-17 Rhinovirus (30 sec)
    Clorox Commericial Solutions® Clorox® Clean-Up Disinfectant Cleaner with Bleach1 (Diluted) 67619-17 Rhinovirus (5 mins)
    Clorox Commercial Solutions® Clorox® Disinfecting Spray 67619-21 Rhinovirus (30 sec)
    Clorox Commercial Solutions® Clorox® 4-in-One Disinfectant & Sanitizer 67619-29 Rhinovirus (5 mins)
    CloroxPro™ Clorox® Disinfecting Wipes 67619-31 Rotavirus (4 min)
    CloroxPro™ Clorox® Germicidal Bleach 67619-32 Rhinovirus (5 min)
    Clorox Commercial Solutions® Clorox® Disinfecting Biostain & Odor Remover 67619-33 Rhinovirus (5 min)

     

    References

    1. 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html Accessed January 21, 2020
    2. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/indehtml
    3. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/about/sympthtml
    4. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/about/transmishtml
    5. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/about/prevhtml

     

     

     

    For more information, contact your Clorox sales representative. Call: 1-800-492-9729

    Visit: www.cloroxpro.com

    © 2020 Clorox Professional Products Company, 1221 Broadway, Oakland, CA 94612.

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